Tag Archives: security

Tonight’s Video Worth Sharing: BLU Studio Energy 2 Did Have a Virus!

By Tim

A few days back I mentioned restoring the BLU Studio Energy 2 phone back to factory defaults and yes it was a long arduous process. Today however I may have discovered why.

Yeah, it looks like there was a virus on it and that virus has now been cleaned/destroyed/defeated! Well, at least for now!

So there isn’t a lot I need to explain that you can’t find out from watching the video below. Perhaps you might even learn something!

That is all for now, except please subscribe to our channel or click those big donation buttons on the website here!

Tim

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Widely used D-Link modem/router under mass attack by potent IoT botnet

By Dan Goodin

Enlarge (credit: D-Link)

Malicious hackers are mass exploiting a critical vulnerability in D-Link DSL routers in an attempt to make them part of Satori, the potent Internet-of-things botnet that’s used to take down websites and mine digital coins, researchers said.

Since making its debut late last year, Satori has proven to be a particularly versatile and sophisticated botnet. It made a name for itself in December when it infected more than 100,000 Internet-connected devices in just 12 hours by exploiting remote code-execution vulnerabilities in Huawei and RealTek routers. A month later, Satori operators released a new version that infected devices used to mine digital coins, proving that the IoT botnet could also take control of more traditional computing devices. In February, Satori resurfaced when it infected tens of thousands of routers manufactured by Dasan Networks.

Building a better mousetrap

A key to Satori’s success is its use of the publicly released Mirai IoT botnet source code to turn devices with easily guessable passwords into platforms for launching Internet-crippling attacks. In 2016, Mirai launched a series of record-setting denial-of-service attacks that took security site KrebsonSecurity offline and also targeted online gamers. Satori operators use the Mirai code as a foundation on which they’ve erected an evolving series of new exploits that allow the botnet to control devices even when they’re secured with strong passwords.

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Source:: Ars Tecnica


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FBI seizes server Russia allegedly used to infect 500,000 consumer routers

By Dan Goodin

Enlarge (credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Russia#/media/File:Flag_of_Russia.svg)

The FBI has seized a key server used to infect more than 500,000 home and small-office routers in a move that significantly frustrates a months long attack that agents say was carried out by the Russian government, The Daily Beast reported late Wednesday.

The takedown stems from an investigation that started no later than last August and culminated in a court order issued Wedesday directing domain registrar Verisign to turn over control of ToKnowAll.com. An FBI affidavit obtained by The Daily Beast said the hacking group behind the attacks is known as Sofacy. The group, which is also known as Fancy Bear, Sednit, and Pawn Storm, is credited with a long list of attacks over the years, including the 2016 hack of the Democratic National Committee.

As Ars reported earlier Wednesday, Cisco researchers said the malware that infected more than 500,000 routers in 54 countries was developed by an advanced nation and implied Russia was responsible, but didn’t definitively name the country.

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Source:: Ars Tecnica

Anyone shocked that the commies in Russia are still being…well, commies?

Tim


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Comcast bug made it shockingly easy to steal customers’ Wi-Fi passwords

By Jon Brodkin

Enlarge (credit: Comcast)

A security hole in a Comcast service-activation website allowed anyone to obtain a customer’s Wi-Fi network name and password by entering the customer’s account number and a partial street address, ZDNet reported yesterday.

The problem would have let attackers “rename Wi-Fi network names and passwords, temporarily locking users out” of their home networks, ZDNet wrote. Obviously, an attacker could also use a Wi-Fi network name and password to log into an unsuspecting Comcast customer’s home network.

Shortly after ZDNet’s story was published, Comcast disabled the website feature that was leaking Wi-Fi passwords. “Within hours of learning of this issue, we shut it down,” Comcast told ZDNet and Ars. “We are conducting a thorough investigation and will take all necessary steps to ensure that this doesn’t happen again.”

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Source:: Ars Tecnica


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Hackers infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

By Dan Goodin

Enlarge / A Linksys WRVS4400N, one of more than a dozen network devices targeted by VPNFilter. (credit: Linksys)

Hackers, possibly working for an advanced nation, have infected more than 500,000 home and small-office routers around the world with malware that can be used to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command, researchers at Cisco warned Wednesday.

VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

Expansive platform serving multiple needs

“We assess with high confidence that this malware is used to create an expansive, hard-to-attribute infrastructure that can be used to serve multiple operational needs of the threat actor,” Cisco researcher William Largent wrote. “Since the affected devices are legitimately owned by businesses or individuals, malicious activity conducted from infected devices could be mistakenly attributed to those who were actually victims of the actor. The capabilities built into the various stages and plugins of the malware are extremely versatile and would enable the actor to take advantage of devices in multiple ways.”

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Source:: Ars Tecnica


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