Tag Archives: smartphones

Another iPhone 8 leak hints at wireless charging

By Romain Dillet

Slowly but surely, we’re getting hints about the next iPhone from multiple leaks. Today’s new image from @OnLeaks shows that the next iPhone could feature wireless charging. In this iPhone schematic, it’s easy to spot a rounded surface at the back of the device, indicating that there should be a conductive surface to charge the device. I know what you’re thinking… Read More

Source:: TechCrunch Gadgets


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Cube WP10 Unboxing: Feels Like a Tablet, It’s in Fact an Original Windows 10 Mobile Phone

By James A.

We’ve unboxed a Xiaomi phablet recently and now it’s time to take things up a notch. I’m talking about the Cube WP10, that is right at the limit of phablet and tablet. This is a 7 inch smartphone, that somehow manages to run Windows 10 Mobile instead of Windows 10. It’s priced at $110 on GearBest.com.

Since this is an unboxing, let’s see what’s inside the box. There’s an USB cable in the box and documents, but no charger or headphones. As far as specs go, there’s a 6.98 inch screen on board with a 720p resolution and inside the phablet we find a quad core Snapdragon 210 processor, accompanied by 2 GB of RAM and 16 GB of storage. We’ve got a microSD card slot in the mix, WiFi and GPS, plus even 4G makes the cut.

 

Bluetooth is also here, plus a 5 MP back camera and a front 2 MP shooter. Cube WP10 is a dual SIM device that has a pretty modest 2850 mAh battery, at least on paper. We’ll see how it behaves in our tests. Cube WP10 measures 7.6 mm in thickness and weighs 248 grams, both reasonable measurements for such a diagonal. The software experience is rather typical for a Windows 10 Mobile device, with Skype, OneDrive, Office apps and similar features.

We’ll be back with a full review soon and in the meantime you can find the device here.

Source:: Tablet News


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Another Android flagship, the Nexus 6P, hit with class-action lawsuit

By David Kravets

Enlarge / Huawei’s premium phablet, when operational. (credit: Ron Amadeo/Ars Technica)

Seems like makers of flagship Android devices can’t get it right these days. We recently reported on an ever-expanding class-action lawsuit targeting LG’s flagships: the G4, G5, V10, V20, and Nexus 5X. Those phones, according to the suit and thousands of online complaints by users, have a legendary bootloop issue caused by shoddy construction that bricks the phones or slows them to a crawl.

Now the Nexus 6P phablet, unveiled in September 2015 for pre-order, is also being accused in a class-action lawsuit of having a “Bootloop Defect.”  According to the suit, the Nexus 6P devices “are defective because they are prone to enter an endless bootloop cycle which renders them unresponsive and unusable.” What’s more, the suit also alleges a “Battery Drain Defect,” which has also been the subject of repeated online criticism by unhappy Nexus 6P consumers.

“As the numerous complaints posted on product reviews, blogs and other consumer resources reveal, countless consumers have experienced this Defect,” according to the suit. The lawsuit mocks one of the advertisements about the device that claimed: “Battery life keeps you going all day and into the night.”

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Source:: Ars Technica Gadgets


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The Xiaomi Mi 6 out-specs the Galaxy S8 for half the price

By Ron Amadeo

With the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 finally ready for market, it’s time for a round of smartphone updates from the usual suspects. The chip debuted in the Galaxy S8 (full review coming soon), and Xiaomi is now featuring the 835 in the Xiaomi Mi 6, the new flagship for the company’s home market of China.

Unlike the stunning Xiaomi Mi Mix, a slim-bezel “concept” phone from Xiaomi that the company actually sold, the Mi 6 is pretty boring to look at. Xiaomi has fallen back to its standard “do what Apple is doing” design language, with thick bezels on the top and bottom of the phone and a front-mounted fingerprint sensor. It gets a lot harder to complain when you see the price, though: $362 (RMB 2,499).

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Source:: Ars Technica Gadgets


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Meet PINLogger, the drive-by exploit that steals smartphone PINs

By Dan Goodin

Enlarge (credit: Harrison Weber)

Smartphones know an awful lot about us. They know if we’re in a car that’s speeding, and they know when we’re walking, running, or riding in a bus. They know how many calls we make and receive each day and the precise starting and ending time of each one. And of course, they know the personal identification numbers we use to unlock the devices or to log in to sites that are protected by two-factor authentication. Now, researchers have devised an attack that makes it possible for sneaky websites to surreptitiously collect much of that data, often with surprising accuracy.

The demonstrated keylogging attacks are most useful at guessing digits in four-digit PINs, with a 74-percent accuracy the first time it’s entered and a 94-percent chance of success on the third try. The same technique could be used to infer other input, including the lock patterns many Android users rely on to lock their phones, although the accuracy rates would probably be different. The attacks require only that a user open a malicious webpage and enter the characters before closing it. The attack doesn’t require the installation of any malicious apps.

Malicious webpages—or depending on the browser, legitimate sites serving malicious ads or malicious content through HTML-based iframe tags—can mount the attack by using standard JavaScript code that accesses motion and orientation sensors built into virtually all iOS and Android devices. To demonstrate how the attack would work, researchers from Newcastle University in the UK wrote attack code dubbed PINLogger.js. Without any warning or outward sign of what was happening, the JavaScript was able to accurately infer characters being entered into the devices.

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Source:: Ars Tecnica

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